John Mullen of the Boulder Irish music session wrote: I am sending this on to educate and edify…. Subject: Wine It has been scientifically proven that if we drink 1 liter of water each day at the end of the year we would have absorbed more than 1 kilo of Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria found in feces. In other words, we are consuming 1 kilo of Poo. However, we do not run that risk when drinking wine (or rum, whiskey, beer or other liquor) because alcohol has to go through a purification process of boiling, filtering and/or fermenting. WATER = Poo WINE = Health Ergo: It is better to drink wine and talk stupid than to drink water and be full of crap. There is no need to thank me for this valuable information; I am doing it as a public service.

forwarded to us by Conny Cones A police officer pulls over a speeding car. The officer says, ” I clocked you at 80 miles per hour, sir.” The driver says, “Gee, officer I had it on cruise control at 60, perhaps your radar gun needs calibrating.” Not looking up from her knitting the wife says: “Now don’t be silly dear, you know that this car doesn’t have cruise control.” As the officer writes out the ticket, the driver looks over at his wife and growls, “Can’t you please keep your mouth shut for once?” The wife smiles demurely and says, “You should be thankful your radar detector went off when it did.” As the officer makes out the second ticket for the illegal radar detector unit, the man glowers at his wife and says through clenched teeth, “Dammit, woman, can’t you keep your mouth shut?” The officer frowns and says, “And I notice that you’re not wearing your seat belt, sir. That’s an automatic $75 fine.” The driver says, “Yeah, well, you see officer, I had it on, but took it off when you pulled me over so that I could get my license out of my back pocket.” The wife says, “Now, dear, you know very well that you didn’t have your seat belt on. You never wear your seat belt when you’re driving.” And as the police officer is writing out the third ticket, the driver turns to his wife and barks, “WHY DON’T YOU PLEASE SHUT UP??” The officer looks over at the woman and asks, “Does your husband always talk to you this way, Ma’am?” “Only when he’s been drinking.”

forwarded to us from Debbie McComick An Irishman, a Mexican and a Blonde Guy were doing construction work on scaffolding on the 20th floor of a building. They were eating lunch and the Irishman said, “Corned beef and cabbage! If I get corned beef and cabbage one more time for lunch, I’m going to jump off this building.” The Mexican opened his lunch box and exclaimed, “Burritos again! If I get burritos one more time I’m going to jump off, too.” The blonde opened his lunch and said, “Bologna again! If I get a bologna sandwich one more time, I’m jumping too.” The next day, the Irishman opened his lunch box, saw corned beef and cabbage, and jumped to his death. The Mexican opened his lunch, saw a burrito, and jumped, too. The blonde guy opened his lunch, saw the bologna and jumped to his death as well. At the funeral, the Irishman’s wife was weeping. She said, “If I’d known how really tired he was of corned beef and cabbage, I never would have given it to him again!” The Mexican’s wife also wept and said, “I could have given him tacos or enchiladas! I didn’t realize he hated burritos so much.” Everyone turned and stared at the blonde’s wife. The blonde’s wife said, “Don’t look at me. The idiot makes his own lunch.”

When Beoga released their first album “A Lovely Madness” in 2002, it became my favorite album of the year. It was quirky, innovative and darn good fun! Additionally, this Antrim based band are all extremely talented musicians. Beoga are now back with “Mischief” and I’m delighted to say that this new release is as good as, and dare I say it “even better than the first. The title track lives up to its name with its fast paced pair of tunes penned by button accordion player Damien McKee. This is one of the great attractions of this new CD ” the amount of great new original tunes penned by the band. When Beoga released their first album “A Lovely Madness” in 2002, it became my favorite album of the year. It was quirky, innovative and darn good fun! Additionally, this Antrim based band are all extremely talented musicians. Beoga are now back with “Mischief” and I’m delighted to say that this new release is as good as, and dare I say it ” even better than the first. The title track lives up to its name with its fast paced pair of tunes penned by button accordion player Damien McKee. This is one of the great attractions of this new CD ” the amount of great new original tunes penned by the band. “Mischief” is followed up with a jazzy little set called “Kick’n the Box” which is made up of “Luka’s wake/Kick’n the box”. Lest fans of Luka Bloom become unduly worried, the Luka in question was fiddle player Niamh Dunne’s pet mouse. The saxophone work by David Howell is superb as is the Prague Philharmonic Orchestra which joins Beoga on several tunes. In fact, this cut is one of the standout tracks of the album and a good example of what makes this band so amazing. Beoga’s innovative use of outside elements such as the Prague Philharmonic or sax or flugelhorn could be a disaster in the wrong hands. However, Beoga are dead to rights in their musical taste and usage and as a result have produced a sound that is unique, addictive and unbelievably fun. This doesn’t mean they can’t do the trad thing as well. A good example is “Ryan’s Air” ” which although you might be confused to find is in fact a jig ” is dedicated to a “certain” airline which smashed Sean Og Graham’s guitar. Songs abound on this release and reflect the eclectic taste of the band with the American ballad “The Factory Girl”, Steely Dan’s “Dirty Work” and a gorgeous song by Johnny Duhan (best known for his song “The Voyage”) called “A Delicate Thing”. In a recent trend seen by Kris Drever and North Cregg, songs from the 1920′s are coming back in vogue and Beoga have included a ragtime version of “Please Don’t Talk About Me When I’m Gone” in this collection. The majority of tunes on this release are all originals penned by various members of the band. For musicians seeking out the very latest and best of new material ” give a listen to “Cu Chullain’s Despair”, “Trolleyed”, “Jazzy Wilbur” or “Mickey The Pipes”. The whole thing winds up with the lovely, soft “Another Journey” composed by Sean Og and dedicated to all good friends and musicians he has met along the way. “Mischief” is well on the way to being my favorite album for 2007. It could be yours as well. Check it out at: www.beogamusic.com Beoga are: Liam Bradley Piano/Keys/Hammond Organ/Backing Vocals Niamh Dunne Lead vocal/fiddle Eamon Murray Bodhran/Cajon/Kit/Percussion/Backing Vocals Damian McKee Button Accordion/ Backing Vocals Sean Og Graham Button Accordion/Guitar/Bouzouki/Mandolin/ backing vocals Beoga are joined by: The Prague Philharmonic Orchestra Mudd Wallace electric guitar John Fitzpatrick violin Brona Graham banjo Lisa Murray whistle Odhran Devlin bass Claire Creelman harp David Howell clarinet/saxophone Linley Hamilton trumpet/flugelhorn Cindy Reich is a contributing writer to “The Living Tradition”, Ayrshire, Scotland, “Irish Music Magazine”, Dublin, Ireland, and presents the radio music show, “The Long Acre” on Mondays, 1pm-3pm on 88.9 FM, KRFC Ft. Collins

Reviewed by Mary McWay Seaman, Celtic Connection, May, 2007
A full sensory excursion to the beginnings of the British penal colony in New South Wales awaits in Thomas Keneally’s A COMMONWEALTH OF THIEVES: THE IMPROBABLE BIRTH OF AUSTRALIA. The book also offers an escorted tour through the mean streets of late 18th-century England and its barbarous prisons. This is not one of those sweeping overviews of a country’s entire history; the book’s power lies in the coverage of the colony’s founding by British and Irish settlers during a brief span from the 1780s to the early 1800s. Despite the Enlightenment’s brilliant minds (Samuel Johnson, James Boswell et al.) English society was still short on mercy, brotherhood and inclusiveness. Poverty and crime had increased dramatically in London when “enclosure,” a land reorganization that barred peasants from the use of formerly common fields, was instituted throughout the countryside. Thousands of rural folks were forced off the land and into urban lives of crime. Death sentences were routinely meted out for larceny, women were burned at the stake, and children as young as nine were incarcerated for petty theft. The author marches readers briskly across the slimy grounds of London’s infamous Newgate Prison. In those days lockups were essentially franchise businesses run by subcontractors who charged inmates according to levels of accommodation. For the poor and insane, they were cold, foul, lice-ridden, rat-infested, overcrowded hellholes. Keneally found that “Doctors often refused to enter the prison for fear their own health would suffer. Yet every day, ordinary people came to visit or sightsee, as we might now visit a zoo.” Unspeakable congestion led to the confinement of some prisoners on ships, or hulks, moored on the Thames, at Portsmouth and Plymouth. These vessels, notorious for epidemics and savagery, housed convicts for months and even years, and citizens wanted them out. American destinations were closed after the War of Independence, so officials sent them to Australia, launching another colonial experiment to test the merits of plantation on human reform, to check for additional resources as the slave trade was winding down, and to increase trade with China, India and Southeast Asia. Dumping other undesirables, especially Irish captives from the failed Rebellion of 1798 and sundry Scottish separatists, offered an additional benefit. Irish, Scottish, Welsh and Cornish names jump off the pages; McCabe, McCormick, McEntire, Crowley, Hart, Leary, Sullivan, Kerwin, Martin, Rositer, Mullens, Burns, Kelly, Fitzgerald, Ryan, Barrett, Foley, Corbett, Considen, Dempsey, Allen, Balmain, Ramsay, Johnston, Campbell, McClennan, Nicol, Macarthur, Bryant, Broad, King, Ruse and Veal are just a few. It’s possible that the prospect of back-to-nature, survival-type country living appealed to some refugees, though few would have been able to envision the coming hardships that would equal or exceed their present sorrows. Keneallys narrative captures the substance of the era by letting scores of people tell their own stories; the richness of this commanding account springs from on-the-ground reporting by all classes of British, Irish and native Australian players. The able naval commander Arthur Phillip was selected to lead the first of three armadas to Botany Bay, although this site was abandoned in favor of Sydney Cove, a more hospitable harbor to the north. Readers come to know Phillip well, as Keneally’s masterful character depiction is one of the most thorough and impressive portrayals I have read. The decent, conscientious realist from humble origins did his best to mitigate the vile conditions on board the claustrophobic, contagion-soaked hulks only to see biology trump good intentions as the travelers suffered protein and vitamin deficiencies. Typhus ravaged crew and captives alike, and the colonists, like others throughout history, often failed to enquire about local food sources, weather conditions and herbal remedies from the natives. Dwindling supplies of rice quivered with bugs, and shortages of pea porridge (lack of vitamin B) led to chronic infections. The absence of fresh fruits and vegetables (lack of vitamin C) propelled the sores, debility, and derangement of scurvy, the sailors’ ancient curse. The ragged population required food and clothing (especially shoes) from supply ships for several years and faced famine between deliveries. Poisonous deliveries from Europe deposited on the indigenous population included smallpox, viruses and venereal infections. The author’s accounts of encounters between natives and newcomers comprise a compelling saga in itself. Some of Keneally’s finest work exhibits enduring human traits – virtues and iniquities alike – rendered through heroic drama and comical peccadilloes. His genius at conjuring the chaos of the early Sydney camps creates a stunning testimony. By 1800 there were several thousand colonists living in the area, and the roots of New South Wales took hold through land grants that solidified small towns, farms and fisheries with the bounties of private enterprise. A COMMONWEALTH OF THIEVES: THE IMPROBABLE BIRTH OF AUSTRALIA, vibrates with a buoyant, anecdotal style that mixes up a delicious gumbo of history, politics, travel, geography, anthropology and sociology. Many nations become known for a particular personality; we now have it on good authority that Australia’s fine reputation for limitless camaraderie, outdoorsy lifestyles, and that indefinable, spirited love of adventure is the sparkling legacy of forebears who found, at last, a glad new morning.

Oideas Gael courses are not just for absolute beginners, but also ideally suited for individuals, who have been out of touch and are now keen to brush up on their conversational Irish. The most popular programmes are the Irish language courses for adults, offered at all levels. As these courses focus on spoken Irish, in a relaxed but stimulating environment, adults discover a propensity for language learning above their expectations. While an Irish person may initially feel nervous, learning in the company of a Japanese, Swedish or Italian native, they rise to the test and accept the challenge with vigour. Cultural holiday courses are also offered in Hill walking, Donegal Dances, Marine Painting, Archaeology, Landscape & Environment, Harp, Bodhr”n & Flute-playing and Celtic Pottery. The cosmopolitan mix of people ensures that “The Glen” is a lively centre of cultural activity all through the summer, with the best of traditional music and craic. Liam ” Cuinneag”in, the programme director, says a large proportion of the learners from abroad might have no links with Ireland, yet inevitably develop a love of all things Irish through the programme music, dance and/or literature. “We teach Irish in a manner that makes it accessible for people. It’s not all study; there are varied activities including dancing, singing, all through Irish. It makes it interesting for people. It’s amusing at times, but some of them are better at Irish than English,” he says. For more information on the Oideas Gael culture programmes call 011-353-74-973-0248. Fax 011-353-74-973-0348. oideasgael@eircom.net. oideasgael.com For lessons in Denver call Noel Mullan at 720-839-7645 or Mick Bolger at 303-455-7509.

Many personal tales of Ireland’s brief civil war (1922 -1 923) have never been recorded, but thanks to this film (fictional), some composite accounts from rural County Cork will be preserved. The drama opens in 1920 with two siblings, Teddy O’Donovan, an IRA man continuing the fight for independence in the wake of the Easter Rising of 1916, with his doctor brother, Damien, joining him after a brutal attack by an occupying British Black and Tan regiment (hardened cases just back from the fronts of WWI). Action-packed shoot-em-ups and ambushes rival any American Western. The violence, including gun battles, a grisly torture scene courtesy of the barking Black and Tans, and executions of an informer and a Big House, Anglo landlord, is neither gratuitous nor graphic; that said, be mindful that this film is not for kids. Set in an Ireland light years distant from the Tiger of today, the movie often takes on a documentary feel, especially during political meetings where hard decision-making educates about the nuts and bolts of funding rebellion. A local Irish court, set up in lieu of the English one, considers punishment of an Irish merchant who was generous to IRA needs, but charged by his neighbors for extorting exorbitant interest on basic commodities. Complexities of this sort, along with vigorous character development and some delightful romance, escalate internal conflicts, large and small. Minimal background music contributes to realism, though bits of traditional instrumental and a cappella songs are inserted at perfect intervals.

Carusos book is a true story of how he, a young New York Italian, raised in an Orthodox Jewish community, becomes the Irish “O’Caruso” as a result of an airplane crash of Flying Tiger Lines Flight 923 which occurred in the North Atlantic Ocean, at night during a raging storm, 500 miles off the West Coast of Ireland. A seemingly disconnected series of coincidences led to O’Caruso’s adoption of Ireland as home, Fred & wife Ellen will be pitching the book for three days at No America’s largest book exposition, The Book Exposition of America, in New York City, June 1-3.

The Denver Gaels football and hurling team each had their game debut at Dicks Sporting Goods fields on Sunday afternoon April 15, 2007. There were people of all ages playing as well as sitting on the sidelines enjoying the games. Over 25 new players came to try their hand at the sports for two hours of drills and games. Many players and their families enjoyed the rest of their evening at the Rapids game at the stadium just a short walk away. Team practices for youth football, women’s football, men’s football and hurling are in full swing. Midweek practices will take place at Garland Park in Denver, and Sunday practices and scrimmages will take place at Dick’s Sporting Goods fields. Please check the website DenverGaels.com for times, dates, locations, and directions. Hurling Pub leagues officially begin in May on Sunday afternoons from 4-6pm at the Dicks Sporting Goods fields at I-70 & Quebec. For more information or to register, please contact us at denvergaels@yahoo.com. Denver Gaels membership dues can now be paid online, for details go to http://www.denvergaels.com/modules/wfchannel/index.php?pagenum=10, after payment a 2007 membership card will be mailed the address provided. The Denver Gaels hurling team competed in the Hurl ’til Yah Drop tournament in Chicago on Saturday April 21st. They gave their all during their matches with teams from Washington DC and Minneapolis, MN. Each year the number to hurling teams across the country continue to grow with American born players who become quickly hooked to this fantastic sport. We look forward to the many competitions to come. The 2007 league season will officially kick off on May 6th at the new Rapids complex, Dicks Sporting Goods Park at I70 and Quebec. The Irish Rover, Scruffy Murphy’s, Celtic Tavern and Fado will compete to be crowned hurling kingpins of the Rockies. Email us to get your name on your team now before the teams fill up! denvergaels@yahoo.com.

The article quoted a spokesman for the Office of the First and Deputy First Minister having said: “This office is aware that a number of artifacts purported to be from the former Maze/Long Kesh site have been offered for sale on the internet auction site eBay. Purchasers should be aware that in many cases it is impossible to authenticate these artifacts and no individual has been given permission to remove anything from the site.” The eBay sales pitch referred to the five 5-kg pieces of rubble as: An absolute gem of memorabilia for anyone with an interest in the Northern Ireland Troubles and especially the Republican hunger strikers and offered for sale at a starting price of ᆪ1 Euro and $5 U.S. Prisoners convicted of terrorist offences after March 1, 1976 were housed in the eight new H-Blocks that had been constructed at the site, also known as Long Kesh. The hunger strike which would eventually see 10 Republican prisoners die began on March 1, 1981 when Bobby Sands, a 27-year-old who had served four years of a 14-year sentence for possessing firearms, began refusing food. He was joined on March 15 by fellow IRA Maze inmate Francis Hughes, while a week later, IRA man Raymond McCreesh and INLA prisoners leader Patsy O’Hara also joined. They demanded a return to “special status” which included the right to wear their own clothes, the right not to carry out prison work and the right to associate freely with other Republican inmates.

In March “The Emerald Diamond” was seen on SportsNet cable TV and played at the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. Stories in newspapers and on TV stations continue to pop up as sports media people learn about the inspirational story. Fitzgerald recently put a shortened version of the film on the Internet to help spread the word. Have a ten minute laugh at Irish Baseball Movie As Fitzgerald continues to support baseball in Ireland, he recently started a charity to raise money for the Irish National Team and youth baseball programs in Ireland. You can learn more at Support Irish Baseball ; – there are also some outtakes from the movie on that website. Irish Basebll Movie ; Support Irish Baseball

A search in the Annunciation Catholic church records reveals that the most common Irish surnames in Leadville in 1880 were nearly identical with the most common surnames in the Beara peninsula, revealed in the Griffith Valuation Records of 1845:

Leadville
Sullivan
Murphy
Walsh
McDonald
McCarthy
Harrington
Lynch
Gallgher
Ryan
Beara
Sullivan
Murphy
McCarthy
Harrington
Lynch
Ryan
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